linkert

August 25, 2010

Linkert Float Replacement and Adjustment 1964 Harley

After my first ride, I was feeling pretty good about my ‘64 Duo-Glide.  The bike ran great and any problems that I had were due to operator error.  Being my first attempt at using a manual advance system, there were a couple “hiccups” along the way. 

Since I had one successful ride under my belt, I planned to ride the Duo-Glide to work the rest of the week.  The next day, I pushed the bike outside and began going through the start up procedure.  As I got ready to do the two prime kicks, I noticed that gas was pouring out of the carburetor.  Hoping for a stuck float or dirty needle, I started removing parts.  Soon a variety of brackets, oil lines, nuts and More on Linkert Float Replacement and Adjustment 1964 Harley

Filed under Carburetors, Classic Motorcycle Maintenance, Panhead Jim's Blog by PanheadJim

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June 27, 2010

Mr. Big’s Blog – “Linkerts for Dummies”

As I sink deeper into the madness that is vintage motorcycling, I found myself discovering that it’s a really a hobby with lots of little hobbies intertwined which is where I discovered these cool little Linkert carburetors.  As I was collecting parts I needed to transform Ol’ Red from a 1941 Harley Davidson WLA into a 1947 WL, I bought a Linkert M51 to replace the military style M88 which would be correct for my bike.

Lots of Linkerts!

Lots of Linkerts!

 

Wow, what a neat little carb I thought.  So, I started collecting parts just for grins.  Carb bodies, fuel bowls, Hi and Lo speed needles, throttle plates, and so forth.  I bought the Victory Linkert book, which I highly recommend, to further my education.  When I first got it, it looked like it was mainly about performance tuning, but it really has a lot of basic information that a rookie like myself could use.

So, my first Linkert M51 that I purchased turned out to be not exactly what I needed.  Had I stuck my nose in my “How to Restore your Harley Davidson” by Bruce Palmer III like I should have, I would have discovered that there were two versions of the M51.  The bodies produced up to 1939 were called a “4 line” because it has “Langenskamp-Linkert” on the carb body along with 3 lines of text.  From 1940 on, the carb body was produced with “L & L Manufacturing” on the body along with 2 lines of text making it a “3 line” carburetor.

"4 Line" & "3 Line" Linkerts

"4 Line" & "3 Line" Linkerts

 

To be correct for a 1947 WL, I would need the “3 line” Linkert M51.  So, I purchased the later carb body along with as many OEM and NOS parts as I could find and set about rebuilding one for Ol’ Red.  Starting off, the body I selected (I have three of ‘em) got a good bath in a bucket of carb cleaner and I continued the cleaning process by making sure all the Hi and Lo speed circuits were cleaned out and all the threads were good.

More on Mr. Big’s Blog – “Linkerts for Dummies”

Filed under Mr. Big's Blog, Random Ideas by Mr. Big

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April 5, 2009

Classic Harley Homework – My 1924 Harley JD Motorcycle

Got some time today to tinker a bit more with my 1924 JDCA and, now that I am finally getting serious about the machine, I am studying it more and getting to find out things I might not have wanted to discover.

You see, I used to think this bike was 99% original and correct. I still want to believe that but it isn’t. The more I look into it the more I find wrong or incorrect. Not anything really big, but a lot of bits and pieces. I am guessing this bike was owned and built by someone with more time and knowledge than money or access to the correct parts. It runs strong so I am pleased with it but would like to move it more towards correct if that is reasonable.

Among the items that look good but are not original, I have identified the following so far:

Indian Linkert Carb With Aftermarket Air Horn

Indian Linkert Carb With Aftermarket Air Horn

Carburetor is a later Indian Linkert (not a stock Schebler carburetor). Runs great, starts easily and idles nicely, so I am OK with this. I have to find the right looking cover – perhaps alter 1928/29 snorkel unit.

Kicker pedal is a rare 1945/46 Knucklehead unit. I removed that today and replaced it with a well worn traditional “bicycle pedal” Harley unit that looks pretty good on it. A friend who is heavily involved in the Knucklehead Harley scene wants to but the pedal, so I know it will go to a good home.

Correct Headlight Lens Should Be Flat For a JD

Correct Headlight Lens Should Be Flat For a JD

Headlight lens. I believe the headlight is correct and original, but the lens isn’t. It bows out at the middle and I was told the correct original lens on a 1924 Harley should be flt. Besides, my lens More on Classic Harley Homework – My 1924 Harley JD Motorcycle

Filed under Buzz Kanter Classic Motorcycle Blog, Carburetors, Restoration by Buzz_Kanter

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