1924 Harley

December 24, 2009

Vintage Sidestand Install On My Classic 1924 Harley Motorcycle

Most of my time, energy and patience is tied up in my newest project – the very early teens Harley twin (part 1914, part 1919 and more) for the Motorcycle Cannonball. But until the actual project bike arrives in another week or two (truckers like to go home for Christmas too) there is not a lot I can do other than search for parts and resources for when it actually arrives.

So…in the meantime I have plenty of other unfinished projects in the garage. One of them is my 1924 Harley JDCA. It’s a great bike and mostly original paint and parts. I have owned it for almost 20 years but only got it sorted out and running right in the last year or so. In 2009 I guess I have put at least 1,000 miles on this wonderful vintage Harley. And I sure plan on putting on more miles in the year to come.

My Vintage Harley JD - What A Great Old Bike!

My Vintage Harley JD - What A Great Old Bike!

While it is together, running and dependable, there are a couple of items I’d like to find and install on the JD Harley. These include a side stand, an original tool box and perhaps a More on Vintage Sidestand Install On My Classic 1924 Harley Motorcycle

Filed under Buzz Kanter Classic Motorcycle Blog, Restoration by Buzz_Kanter

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May 25, 2009

Progress on my 1924 Harley JD Carb & Headlight

OK, recognizing that I simple don’t have enough spare time to do my old Harley justice before the AMA’s 85th anniversary motorcycle event in Ohio I contacted my pal Dave Fusiak or Flat Out Motorcycles in New York State. Besides being a great guy and an impressive wrench with old Harley motorcycles, he is less than an hour away and knows the old Harleys very well – especially early competition and 8-valve Harley racers.

1920s Harley 8-valve racer in Dave Fusiak's house

1920s Harley racer in Dave Fusiak's house

Before bringing the bike over to Dave’s shop I was able to rebend the stock Harley handlebars on my JD so they are a bit higher and wider at the grips.

I trucked the old Harley V-twin motorcycle over to his place with a list of items that needed addressing. Briefly they include: Swap modified VL primary cover for a correct 1924 era JD primary cover I supplied him with and make sure it fits and looks correct, swap the Indian motorcycle Linkert carburetor on the bike for the correct Schebler carburetor I supplied him with. Also weld up correct but leaking 1924-only muffler, replace the cracked and incorrect fluted headlight lens with a plain lens, and a number of other items.

As soon as we got there Dave jumped right in. First he pulled off the Indian-spec Linkert carb and handed it back to me, then he pulled down the Schebler to discover – as expected – the float was shot. Time to order a new float and rebuild the carburetor before putting it back on the old Harley.

Newer but incorrect Indian Linkert carburetor on the Harley, older but correct Schebler carburetor in hand

Newer but incorrect Indian Linkert carburetor on the Harley, older but correct Schebler carburetor in hand

Next Dave looked into the headlight situation. We knew from prior research that the correct lens for the 1924 Harley should be clear flat glass. The lens on my bike was fluted, bowed out in the middle and was cracked. I figure we could simply get a piece of clear glass at any glass store.

Dave removed the outer chrome ring stating he did not think Harley would have used chrome in 1924. I later researched this and Dave was correct. It appears I have the correct bucket, mounting and reflector, but an incorrect headlight lens and mounting ring on the outside. We will either find a correct one to replace the chrome ring or paint it to match the rest of the bike until we can find the original Harley part.

The old lens was taped in place and we carefully pried it off and cleaned up the housing and reflector. We were pleased to find the headlight worked on both high and low settings.

More details to follow as we make more progress on bringing this old Harley back to as correct as possible.

Filed under Buzz Kanter Classic Motorcycle Blog, Carburetors, Restoration by Buzz_Kanter

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May 19, 2009

My 1924 Harley JD Project – I Bent My Handlebars

In spite of owning this 1924, 85 year old Harley,  for almost twenty years, I have never ridden it much. It sat with a stuck engine for the first decade on display in our magazine offices. Then we got it sorted out and running down at Dale Walksler’s Wheels Through Time Museum. Then it sat for a few more years. I have ridden it a few times but found the handlebars too uncomfortable to ride with confidence.

My mostly original and correct 1924 Harley JDCA motoryccle

My mostly original and correct 1924 Harley JDCA motorcycle

So a couple of days ago I bent the original 1924 Harley-Davidson handlebars. They were too low and too narrow for me to be able to ride the bike with comfort and ease. I was concerned about damaging them if I tried to bend the old handlebars but was determined to make them more practical so I could ride the bike.

I bent my Old Harley-Davidson handlebars

I bent my old Harley-Davidson handlebars

Following the instructions given to me by Tom Faber of More on My 1924 Harley JD Project – I Bent My Handlebars

Filed under Buzz Kanter Classic Motorcycle Blog, Restoration, Tech by Buzz_Kanter

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