Panhead Jim’s Blog

April 24, 2014

Building a Harley-Davidson VL: Transmission Rebuild

CAI12

For my ’33, I decided to go with the standard 3-speed transmission.  There was also a 3-speed with reverse available that same year for sidecar use, but I think the standard 3-speed will suit my needs just fine and from talking with those that do run sidecars, the rig is light enough that you can manage it without reverse.  I started out with a ’32-’35 case, which is easily distinguished from the previous and later models by a large mounting boss located behind the main sprocket which is used for attaching the primary.  The case was in excellent condition and only needed surface cleaning to prep it for building.

CAI13 More on Building a Harley-Davidson VL: Transmission Rebuild

Filed under Engine & Transmission, Panhead Jim's Blog, Restoration by PanheadJim

Permalink Print
Share/Save/Bookmark

March 26, 2014

Racing in the Capitol City

Benning01

Like most early motorcycle and auto racing tracks, the racetrack at Benning, Maryland started out as a horse track.  Opening on April 1, 1890, the track faced stiff competition from neighboring tracks in Anacostia, Brightwood and Ivy City, but within a few years it became popular with “Washington society” and it’s attendance increased tremendously.  It was also rumored that there were “shady” betting practices occurring at the track which seems unusual for a venue that was frequented by congressmen and other public servants…  Ultimately, horse racing was banned in the District of Columbia in 1908 leaving Benning open for motorsports. More on Racing in the Capitol City

Filed under Classic Harley History, Classic Indian Motorcycle History, Competition Motorcycles, History, Panhead Jim's Blog by PanheadJim

Permalink Print
Share/Save/Bookmark

March 12, 2014

Building a Harley-Davidson VL: Engine Preparation

CAI12

Over the winter, I’ve made a lot of progress on my 1933 Harley-Davidson build.  Now that the engine has been sent to the machine shop for rebuilding, I wanted to take some time and write about what it took to get the engine ready to be rebuilt.  If I had to sum it all up with one picture, it would definitely be this one of me standing at the blasting cabinet.  Almost every part had to be cleaned with fine aluminum oxide media to remove 80+ years of dirt and grime.

CAI11

More on Building a Harley-Davidson VL: Engine Preparation

Filed under Engine & Transmission, Panhead Jim's Blog, Restoration, Tech by PanheadJim

Permalink Print
Share/Save/Bookmark