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Thread: MV Agusta 750 four

  1. #1

    MV Agusta 750 four

    Has anyone owned a MV Agusta 750 four ?
    What are they like ?
    Are they similar to a Honda 750 four or Kaw Z1 ?
    Are they reliable or not ?
    What did they cost in 1972 ?
    I have never seen one.
    Wikipedia says made from 72 to 78.


  2. #2

    Re: MV Agusta 750 four

    Owned a '76 for quite a few years. Most incredible sounding motorcycle I've ever owned! (Mine had a bunch of factory hot rod parts that added to the music, but even stock they make a beautiful noise.) Build quality was very good by '70s standards. I never had any issues with mine once I "recommissioned" it. It had sat for nearly 25 years and needed a thorough going through. They are fairly straight forward to work on once you put your Italian engineer hat on . Parts are out there, but not easy to find. If you own one, you almost have to join the British based MV Agusta club as the club bought most of the remaining inventory from MV when they stopped motorcycle production in the late '70s. When you need something, you send them your list, and when they have a chance to check their stores, they get back to you with what they have left.

    As for riding, they are big and very heavy. Handling is fair at best. Mine and most everyone else's I've spoken to had a high speed "wobble" (more of a "weave") that was extremely unnerving above about 80mph. Mine still had stock rear shocks, and I'm told that a set of period Konis helps quite a bit. Brakes are Scarabs and (when sorted) are decent for a 70's era machine. Despite what you will read in the period reviews, a 70's era Honda 750 or Kawasaki Z1 will eat its lunch. And if you have to have Italian, a 70's era Ducati or Laverda will do the same. That said, they are beautiful to look at and to listen to.

    The pricing on them has gone a bit nuts in the last ten years or so, and I just didn't ride mine enough to justify keeping it. Honestly, I wasn't sorry to see it go. I'd rather ride my Knucklehead!

    Hope that helps.
    Chuck S.
    Last edited by wallaman; 12-08-2018 at 03:55 PM.

  3. #3

    Re: MV Agusta 750 four

    Chuck,
    Thanks for the review.
    I was hoping someone owned one and could tell me what it was like.
    69 Honda 750 four $1500, 73 Kaw Z1 $2000, 72 MV Agusta 750 four $6000, very expensive.
    Jay Leno has a great video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0epQVh_NhSA

  4. #4

    Re: MV Agusta 750 four

    The count Agusta didn't like to sell any really racing machines, as those of Agostini. and wished to have it with a lumbering shaft trasmission. 6000 bucks are a good deal for this bike, as here in Europe can reach 10000 . Btw a good V7 or the jap bikes of the time, as Dukes and the marvelous Laverdas, as said b4, was absolutely better for road racing...

  5. Re: MV Agusta 750 four

    1966 was the first year of production, if my memory serves me correct. the engine is dohc, Honda was making insane 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 cylinder machines in the late 50's thru '68, so MV making a production dohc 4 in 1966 was a BIG deal from a production standpoint, much less technologically, shaft drive in a transverse 4, i'm not aware of anyone doing that prior. while some italian machines of of the 50's through the 70's were fragile and even worse had design flaws, the craftsmanship is some of, if not the finest. Moto Guzzi has won more world racing championships than any other manufacturer, and Moto Guzzi left the World GP circuit in 1957. Moto Guzzi crossed the Arctic Circle in 1928. that MV in the picture, 556 were produced. i am guessing it couldn't be purchased for less than $50K. i wouldn't be a bit surprised even $100K. There is no production Japanese trans-4 that can compare to the MV, it's like comparing Ferrari's to Ford's.

    https://motoborgotaro.com/sold-motor...erica-for-sale

  6. #6

    Re: MV Agusta 750 four

    Steve,
    Like many objects of desire, often times the reality is a bit less than the mystique. The MV in the link you provided was mine before it went to the guys in NY. They bought it thinking they would make a killing. Maybe they will, but not my business at this point. Yes, it is a beautiful piece of machinery. The design and castings are gorgeous. The gear driven dual overhead cams make a sound that no chain driven Japanese motor from the period can match. And the sound of the engine at any throttle is spectacular. That said, the overall riding experience once the honeymoon wore off just didn't live up to the hype. And at some point, the few poorly thought out "features" it had begin to annoy. Sorry to say, but I don't miss it in my garage. Not saying I'm not glad to have had the experience, I had a lot of fun and good times with it; but there are other motorcycles that I've owned that I still miss and wish I hadn't sold decades after they've been gone. The MV isn't one of them. I know at least several former owners who feel the same. Not saying you shouldn't buy one. We each get to spend what we have how we want. But it's a lot of money to spend on something that may not live up to your dreams about it.
    Just sayin'......

    Chuck S.

  7. Re: MV Agusta 750 four

    Quote Originally Posted by wallaman View Post
    Steve,
    Like many objects of desire, often times the reality is a bit less than the mystique. The MV in the link you provided was mine before it went to the guys in NY. They bought it thinking they would make a killing. Maybe they will, but not my business at this point. Yes, it is a beautiful piece of machinery. The design and castings are gorgeous. The gear driven dual overhead cams make a sound that no chain driven Japanese motor from the period can match. And the sound of the engine at any throttle is spectacular. That said, the overall riding experience once the honeymoon wore off just didn't live up to the hype. And at some point, the few poorly thought out "features" it had begin to annoy. Sorry to say, but I don't miss it in my garage. Not saying I'm not glad to have had the experience, I had a lot of fun and good times with it; but there are other motorcycles that I've owned that I still miss and wish I hadn't sold decades after they've been gone. The MV isn't one of them. I know at least several former owners who feel the same. Not saying you shouldn't buy one. We each get to spend what we have how we want. But it's a lot of money to spend on something that may not live up to your dreams about it.
    Just sayin'......

    Chuck S.
    damn! it is a small world! whoda guess the link i posted was your bike! i fully agree with your comments on these old bikes that were new when we grew up with them. (my point was intended that the MV4 was not in the same league as a Japanese 4.) just goes to show how much bikes have improved in 50 years. My dad bought new a 750 Honda September 30, 1969. i rode our 67 BSA Lightning to the dealer to trade it off; i remember thinking i could hardly wait to get off the damn thing and had no idea what to expect riding home on a 4 cylinder would be like. what i knew is i was full of anticipation and excitement. riding home as it was turning dark, i switched the lights on and i remember between the speedo/tach glowing, so easily visible, the smoothness of the machine, the power at hand and the sound of the exhaust, i felt like i was manning a space ship. fast forward 40 years, after owning a couple BMW's and Ducati's i go the idea in my head it would be nice to have one like i had new in 1969. what i remembered about the bike was that it was fast, smooth and comfortable. after i restored my first 69 and took it out for its first ride i was immediately struck with how heavy, under-braked and under-powered it was i quickly realized i was in the year 2000 and my fond memories of my first 750 had been rooted in 1969. so, i fully understand what you mean. none the less any of those now old bikes, (especially the transverse 4's) from the mid 60's through early 70's is a masterpiece and represents a real golden age of its own in motorcycling. Right up through the later 60's, reliable, affordable transverse multi cylinder powered motorcycles were a thing of dreams and only seen or read about in the GP. the advent of the MV 4, then Munch Mammut made the dream a bit more real if not surreal. By the time bits of information and photos were read and seen in magazines of the day of Honda testing a trans4, then rumors began buzzing of Honda making a trans4 available to the public, and the macines landed on dealer showroom floors, the dream was realized.
    Last edited by Steve Swan; 12-10-2018 at 02:39 PM.

  8. #8

    Re: MV Agusta 750 four

    1946 Indian Chief
    1992 Harley-Davidson Heritage Softail


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