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Thread: JD Oil Rings - Necessary or Toss Them?

  1. Re: JD Oil Rings - Necessary or Toss Them?

    The purpose of the oil control ring is to retain and distribute oil evenly around the piston, so removing it will probably not achieve what you want. The ring above it is the scraper ring, which is beveled to keep the oil below it. Reversing it will cause a lot of oil to pass by it, so it may be best to install a plain ring in place of it. My concern would be not passing enough fresh oil to the lower end in order to avoid sumping. The obvious solution is a return pump!

  2. #12

    Re: JD Oil Rings - Necessary or Toss Them?

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Swan View Post
    Will, i am glad you posted this topic. i know there are guys out there who've done what you are asking about. Jerry Weiland comes to mind, but i don't know if he posts on caimag, i know he posts occasionally on amca.

    i am running one thin washer, but have not had time to do another test ride to see how much oil is going past the mechanical oiler. i am thinking i'll need (as Jon Neuman suggests) to remove the last washer, as two thin washer was allowing alot more oil into crankcase than i would like after a 30 mile test ride. it certainly would be ideal to get the oiler "output" to match the amount that gets past the rings. fortunately or unfortunately (depends on what perspective one is coming from) i don't have enough oil leakage (yet) after 180 miles to spot my garage floor.

    Steve! We are classic over thinkers I think but there isn't enough public knowledge for me to make a sound decision without consulting at least a few people. I called Jerry the other day and actually am going to vend with him today @ the Saint Paul Swap. He says he ran one piston with an oil ring and one piston without. His experience is the front cylinders seizing up due to rear cylinder getting the lions share of the oil sling off the flywheels. We also talked a bit about baffles (not to drag that dogma into this thread) and makes a decent argument that the baffles muffle some of the excess oil sling and allows the front to receive a more equal share.

    Good to know someone agrees with the no washer theory.

    A testament to the fine work is the lack of oil leaks that's for sure. Must be something to do with your sandcast experience.... I slightly leak out of the gear case to engine surface and the cover as well, I've meant to lap them together but havn't found the motivation to remove the pins.

    Thanks for the input Steve!
    27 JD (almost)

  3. #13

    Re: JD Oil Rings - Necessary or Toss Them?

    Quote Originally Posted by Knuckleheadtim View Post
    The purpose of the oil control ring is to retain and distribute oil evenly around the piston, so removing it will probably not achieve what you want. The ring above it is the scraper ring, which is beveled to keep the oil below it. Reversing it will cause a lot of oil to pass by it, so it may be best to install a plain ring in place of it. My concern would be not passing enough fresh oil to the lower end in order to avoid sumping. The obvious solution is a return pump!
    I've always had a bit of jealousy with the 101 guys who can run return pumps in their early engines with the later oil pumps. I wish there was a return option that's for sure! It would take the anxiety about oiling out of my mind.
    27 JD (almost)

  4. Re: JD Oil Rings - Necessary or Toss Them?

    Hi Will,

    Thanks for sharing your thoughts on oiling. Yeah, I am going with when we started out we were both on a steep learning curve and no prior experience with an early engine such as these, and only had experience mostly with post-WW2 machinery. In fact, I had never seen a JD when I bought mine and so I felt duty bound to understand what I felt I needed to know. So, I am not going to fault myself for over-thinking something when I am simply trying to understand. Once again, I must thank the members of this board, AMCA and JD Yahoo Groups for their patience in sharing with me the wisdom of their experience.

    Please do keep posting what you learn, with exception to the top of the piston, we are running the same set up. At 180 miles, everything seems to be going down the road fine for me. As my engine seems to idle and accelerate smoothly and evenly I am still concerned about the fact my front cylinder gets noticeably hotter quicker than the rear. I am running PEEK in my manifold joints. I have never put a heat gun to it, that is something I definitely must do, but last I tested for vacuum leaks, using both bubbles via atomizer and a smoke machine, I had no leaks. Probably need to check again for leaks. If anyone can think of a reason other than an intake leak, I’d like to hear it. (I sealed my intake pockets with Permatex, as per Jon Neuman’s instruction.)

    Will, please keep posting, I feel this is a valid thread and would be nice to hear form as many people as we can to maybe reach some sort of consensus. The only other factor I can think about in terms rings and baffles is the type of use the bike is used for – Cannonball vs. less than 200 miles per year vs. having fun thrashing them like they were back in the day.

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