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Thread: Some assembly required.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Northeast TX
    Posts
    1,081

    Some assembly required.

    To have the right to do something is not the same as to be right in doing it.

    49 FL Love/Hate Relationship

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    291

    Re: Some assembly required.

    I wonder how much that would fetch on Ebay if it was found in an attic....

  3. Re: Some assembly required.

    I wonder how they kept from scratching the paint? if I packed parts like that there wouldnt be any paint left on it. Hell, Just me looking at the picture probably left scratches
    Bob Williams

  4. #4

    Re: Some assembly required.

    That's how they shipped both Harleys and Indians overseas for the Army during WWI. Indian had a "kit" that included a 1917 61" Powerplus and a sidecar, packed in a single crate with a booklet of re-assembly instructions! In English only. Imagine dat!
    Sarge, Gerry Lyons, Fla.
    AGENT ORRNGE Survivor. So far.
    The Friendly Fire that Keeps on Burnin'.
    F.O.G. member: http://flatheadownersgroup.com/
    www.37UL.com
    "It's a 1937, and the downside is, it's out of warranty"

  5. #5

    Re: Some assembly required.

    Seems easy enough. Looks like everything is there excluding the hardware..

  6. #6

    Re: Some assembly required.

    The hardware's in dere. You can bet your life on it. Everything's in there but the tools to put it together with. But the rider's toolkit was included, so it might do everything but put itself together.

    I knew a man who bought what was probably the last WWI Indian-in-a-crate, from Frankfort Arsenal near Philly at a surplus sale, sealed up crate sight-unseen, in 1953 or so. Just a crate with an "Indian Motorcycle Co." logo on the outside. 'Only paid a few bux for it.

    He opened it up and assembled the bike, copied the instruction pamphlet (gave me a copy, later) and sold the sidecar to a Pa. friend who civilianized it and painted it red and attached it to his over-chromed 1916 Powerplus (well, that's the way they "restored" things in those days). Imagine if he'd somehow had the foresight to just preserve the crate until today...
    Sarge, Gerry Lyons, Fla.
    AGENT ORRNGE Survivor. So far.
    The Friendly Fire that Keeps on Burnin'.
    F.O.G. member: http://flatheadownersgroup.com/
    www.37UL.com
    "It's a 1937, and the downside is, it's out of warranty"

  7. #7

    Re: Some assembly required.

    Chris Haynes
    A.M.C.A. Member
    Costco Member
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    http://vintageamericanmotorcycles.com/
    Be sure to register so you can view large photos

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida
    Posts
    6,211

    Re: Some assembly required.

    The first picture Morgan posted is of a very rare bird. It's a '16E, 1916 single speed twin. I've never seen one, and I don't know if any still exist. I would believe it was even rare in it's day because H-D had introduced the 3 speed trans in 1915 and that pretty much made everything made before, obsolete. I've always loved that picture.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Lachenaie, QC
    Posts
    1,716

    Re: Some assembly required.

    Quote Originally Posted by axeric View Post
    The first picture Morgan posted is of a very rare bird. It's a '16E, 1916 single speed twin. I've never seen one, and I don't know if any still exist. I would believe it was even rare in it's day because H-D had introduced the 3 speed trans in 1915 and that pretty much made everything made before, obsolete. I've always loved that picture.

    Eric, for the lesson, what makes it a very rare bird?
    Bob
    43 wlc

    '' 4 wheels move the body, 2 wheels move the soul ''

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida
    Posts
    6,211

    Re: Some assembly required.

    It's the single speed transmission Bob. 1916 was a very interesting year for H-D, Indian, and Excelsior because they all had 3 speed transmissions, and they had just made the giant step in 1915 into the modern era of motorcycles. The 16E in the picture that Morgan posted was already an antique and was probably made to satisfy the few customers that hadn't accepted the new fangled 3 speed transmission. Also, there were businesses that wanted a simple commercial vehicle for delivery service, and they wanted a slow, reliable motorcycle that could pull a sidevan, or keep a crazy delivery boy from going too fast.

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