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Thread: Bike Building Workbench/Table?

  1. #11
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    Oct 2011
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    Smyrna, GA (Metro Atlanta)
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    Re: Bike Building Workbench/Table?

    I guess they have made it real difficult, this is the message I got when I hit register.

    "Sorry, registration has been disabled by the administrator."

    Quote Originally Posted by Sarge View Post
    I did a whole how-to build thread for that bench over on www.Shovelhead.us/forum just before Christmas, but you have to sign up on Shovelhead.us to open it. Shovelhead just makes you wait a little and dive through a couple of hoops, takes a day or two, to prove you're not a spammer or a snothead before getting full access, is all. Tell um Flathead Sarge sent you. ("Recommended by:")

    Tomcat, above, posted the plans. The thread on Shovelhead I did is a step-by-step w/photos of building the World War II army 45WLA bench off the tailgate of my pickup truck in my driveway with a circular saw and an electric drill in a weekend. It also includes a complete bill of materials. Here:
    http://shovelhead.us/forum/showthread.php?t=123580
    Michael Goehring

    2005 FLHRCI

    1962 FLF

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Twin Cities, MN
    Posts
    3,053

    Re: Bike Building Workbench/Table?

    And you were a layyy-dee! Would 'ju sleep w' me anyhow? Would you wrench my Harrr-lee?"

    I'm no carpenter. No. Really! All my square corners come out somewhere near, sorta, and the lengths of my cuts vary, no matter how careful I try to be. And most of my nails end up bent over and pulled out and thrown in the corner.

    But I just bought a reprint of a little World War II booklet off Fleabay. This is the Cover:


    Owning a military Harley makes you do that kind of thing. It has most of the Harley factory instructions on maintaining a wartime WLA 45 Harley, but also includes some very handy checklists and maintenance schedules to help those charged with keeping WLAs, ULs and even XAs alive during the Big One: 1941-45.

    Remember, those guys, "The Greatest Generation," as Tom Brokaw titled um, were mostly farmboys or city slickers, not necessarily mechanics, who may never have had their hands on a'one of William S. Harley's inventions before they received a letter beginning, "Greetings from the President of the United States..." from their local Selective Service Board sometime after Pearl Harbor, in December, 1941.

    Suddenly, they were made motorcycle mechanics, with little regard for their real talents and aptitudes, and got their asses sent off to North Africa, or Italy, or found themselves on some weensy, little island in the South Pacific, or even Australia (!), where suddenly they were trying to keep a stable of Harleys running in a Cavalry Squadron's, an Armored Division's, or a Transportation Battalion's, or a "Gawd-Only-Knows-What This Unit Is Supposed To Do's" motor pool!

    So, this little book was put out by the MoCo as the war cranked up, through the Armored Force School, then being organized at Fort Knox, Kentucky. It had to cover a lot of territory, in addition to the other factory service and supply manuals then being adapted. It had to be pretty general, and basic, but you can tell that its writers tried to keep it simple, but answer questions the rookie bike wrenches might have had. Includes: Maintenance check list, Lubrication check list, lubrication sheets, Rider's Inspections, War Department lubrication guide (still handy for my old chugger!), Adjustments and Clearances (Carburetor Adjustment, Ignition Timing), Break-in Procedure, 1000 Mile Maintenance Inspection, a list of required tools and even a Wiring Diagram!

    I thought it was pretty good read, good stuff, even after owning and fkg up my old pre-war UL for a couple of decades. One thing that caught my eye looks like something added almost as an afterthought: In the back, just one page, I'm sure added as kind of an afterthought, is "Section VIII:" just two drawings, one is a measured drawing titled:

    "MOTORCYCLE SHOP WORK BENCH"
    Attached is a drawing of a shop bench for the motorcycle. One mechanic by using this bench may raise a motorcycle sufficiently high so that it may be worked on with ease."

    The Plan:





    This looked intriguing. It's pretty much a "measured plan," but the details are sketchy, to be sure. I studied it a little and a light bulb went off. It's apparent that it's intended mostly as a guide for motor pool folks like I described to look at and go scrounging up, even in combat zones, from "locally available materials," for adaptation.
    There's no Bill of Materials included as part of the plan, even. You were supposed to "improvise."

    Not a lot of hardware seemed to be required: a pipe, two caps, three rods of steel "all thread" (I think!), and a couple of nuts and bolts:



    I decided to build this "motorcycle shop work bench" just like a mech-a-neck would be expected to do on the island of Tulagi, in the South Pacific, or maybe in Tripoli, North Africa, or Messina, Sicily, right after we'd liberated those places about seventy years ago, and to make it a Christmas present to my buddy who is trying to build his hot rod Panhead right now on a couple of milk crates in the back room of his house. I mean, it's not a Handy Lift, but I think it'll get him offa the floor!
    __________________
    --Sarge, Gerry Lyons, Florida
    1947 EL
    1948 FL Project
    1947WL Project
    2000FLSTC

    But there's booze in the blender
    And soon it will render
    That frozen concoction that helps me hang on

    You never get better....you just get less awful. "Joe Walsh"

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Twin Cities, MN
    Posts
    3,053

    Re: Bike Building Workbench/Table?

    Part 2:

    First, I ripped in half (24-inches) one 4' x 8' of 3/4" 1-side plywood (cost me about $35 at a box store lumber dept.):


    Half the sheet is the 24-inch-wide top deck of the bench. One of the two sides of the "top box" was laid out on one side of the other half of that 4 x 8 plywood sheet. After ripping that into two 12-inch boards, I stacked um, clamped um, and cut them together. The shape of the sides of the top box was the most complicated layout, but the numbers on the plan are clear. It tapers to only an inch-and-three-quarters at the back end, but that's where the stringers end, with a one-inch lip above the deck all along the sides of the bench. Keeps your tools from rolling off! Thoughtful, eh?

    Three 26-1/2" long quarter-inch all-thread steel rods cross the top box, inside. Only one's shown on the plan, but I used three: front, middle and back (I "improvised." Heh!). I bought them at the hardware store in 30-inch lengths to cut down and bench ground the ends of the threads nice and neat to still take nuts. They are essential to strengthen the top internally. They're pulling against two 1 x 6 bulkheads and a 2 x 2, across near the rear, all pushing out, inside of the completed top box:



    NOTE: This thing is held together entirely by #10 x 1 1/2" flat head wood screws, one box of fifty of um, and all glued together with Liquid Nails® from a caulking gun. No nails at all to ever pull loose!

    I laid out the 'top box' when I screwed and glued the cast-off 1-by-2 stringers to the left and right sides for the 2-foot-wide "floor" to rest on. The two cinder blocks are exactly 25-1/2" apart:


    The box store called them "cull," cast-offs, and had wrapped four warped eight-foot 1-by-2 and 2-by-2 pieces I call "stringers" together and priced the four at 88¢! Half-a-dozen screws held each one to its respective side while the glue dried.The slightly warped 1 x 2's easily straightened out under the influence of 6 screws each and a liberal application of Liquid Nails®.

    Two 24-inch-wide ribs, "bulkheads," and one piece of 2-by-2 (towards the back) hold the sides apart; all-the-while being pulled together by the three, one quarter-inch all-thread rods:


    --Sarge, Gerry Lyons, Florida
    Last edited by tomcat1; 02-02-2013 at 06:49 PM.
    1947 EL
    1948 FL Project
    1947WL Project
    2000FLSTC

    But there's booze in the blender
    And soon it will render
    That frozen concoction that helps me hang on

    You never get better....you just get less awful. "Joe Walsh"

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Twin Cities, MN
    Posts
    3,053

    Re: Bike Building Workbench/Table?

    Part 3:

    A piece of 1-1/4" ("I.D.") galvanized pipe serves as the pivot (I know the plan says "1-inch pipe," but we're adapting on-hand materials, here!)

    Some lessons learned:
    Two scrap 2-by-8" pieces about a foot long (wood I had laying around) were drilled through with a 1-5/8" hole-saw drill bit (Another Ace® hardware purchase), then reamed like hell with a big rat tail file! They don't have to reach the floor. The sides of the bottom box support the bike completely.

    The shape of the 2-by-8"s has to be rounded on top, so as not to interfere with the underside of the deck as it goes up and down, and because of where I placed the pivot, they had to be notched in the back to clear the "transverse bulkhead" I'd already placed in the top box, too near the pivot point. Overall shape of the pipe's pivots remind me of a chess Knight horse's head; the big hole being his eye.

    I stacked them together (regular carpenter's clamps are essential for that part) and cut the outline of them on the band saw and clamped them together in the vise to drill through and ream out, for exact duplication. Then, each were separately clamped in their final positions in the sides of the bottom box, and drilled through for the 3/8" carriage bolts, big flat washers on the insides, and nuts.

    If you drill for the carriage bolts with a big enuf, but not too big drill, you get a little wiggle room to fine tune the pivot points. Don't glue them and you keep that adjust-ability. You may have to slide one or the other forward or backward in order to line up the two stacked 3/4"-thick boxes sides, front-to-back. Only a little 'yaw' and you can miss at front and back.

    The locations of the big holes in the upper box are critical. I built the bottom box out upside down on top of the completed upper box, which was laying on its back on my concrete driveway. I marked where the holes would go through the upper box's sides after clamping (but before drilling) the 2-by-8s into their positions inside the lower box sides.

    Finally, I positioned the big hole right over the point where the rear diagonals of the boxes meet; the plans show it further back, but I made the boxes stay in continuous contact on their long sides all-the-way from the-tail-on-the-ground to fully up position) and the pivot 2-by-8's are carriage bolted, but not glued, though the sides of the base-box.

    The base-box is made from ten feet of a clear twelve-foot 1-by-12" pine plank I'd saved for fifteen years hanging from the ceiling of my garage (I'd thought maybe it would make a bookshelf, "someday." Heh!)
    Each side is 60-inches long, and I cut a couple of insert 1-by-6" ends for the bottom box, 24" each, and the whole thing rests on three 1-by-6" floor "feet," that run across underneath it, maybe 26" long, all screwed & glued:



    I built the base box upside-down on the top box, first laid down, inverted, on the driveway:


    The front guides are short scraps of 2-by-4, spaced away from the inside walls of the top box by the four-inch scrap taken when shortening the 4-by-8 of plywood to 92-inches. Note that the whole bench is upside-down here. The plywood at the bottom is the underside of the bench deck:


    The front guides, left and right, are both bolted through two 3/4-inch boards and the 1-1/2" thick 2-by-4 with 4-inch by 3/8" carriage bolts and also glued in place. They won't need to be adjusted.

    The tops of the plywood layers of the guides extend up to the bottom of the stringers, and the 2-by-4's go all the way up to the underside of the plywood deck that the bike sits on.


    You can see here how the front-most quarter-inch threaded rod is pulling the two sides together just in front of the front "bulkhead" 1-by-6 that's the underside of the top box. The all-thread passes right through the 1-by-2 stringers, just under the deck.

    The two foremost 1-by-6 bulkheads are notched on each side for the 1-by-2's (fourth photo, Part 1 above) & glued and screwed in place. They keep the threaded rods in tension. It's a great little stressed structure. The rear 'stretcher" is just a 24-inch long piece of 2-by-2, close behind the rearmost threaded rod. There's no rear crosspiece at all, just glue and screws, allowing the roll-on ass end to be only three-quarters of an inch thick.
    __________________
    --Sarge, Gerry Lyons, Florida
    1947 EL
    1948 FL Project
    1947WL Project
    2000FLSTC

    But there's booze in the blender
    And soon it will render
    That frozen concoction that helps me hang on

    You never get better....you just get less awful. "Joe Walsh"

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Twin Cities, MN
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    3,053

    Re: Bike Building Workbench/Table?

    Part 4:

    I shaved a diagonal chamfer on each of the fore-end guides with a hand-ax/hatchet so that the front of the top box wouldn't hang up on a corner when coming down to the bottom box, and finished that up with a coarse rasp. Truly things of beauty (hidden underneath!).

    The rear support (here shown upside-down) was a POS twenty-inch wide wooden "panel" that I found in our backyard shed when we moved in to this house 15 years ago. I knew it would come in handy, someday! This could be just another piece of 3/4-inch plywood, about 17-1/2" tall x 20" wide, doubled with a second piece plywood, at least at the hinge end:


    I made it 17-1/2" tall & glued all its once-nailed joints to make it sturdier. It's held in place by 20 inches of piano hinge across the top and a screen-door spring from the hardware store in back. You can kick it forward, stretching the spring, to lower the ass-end of the top box to the ground and take the bike down off the bench, holding the front brake.

    It's also got two 2-inch carriage bolts in the corners nearest the piano hinge to help to hold it together. It's entirely too fancy for the rest of the bench:


    The 2" carriage bolts go backwards through the kick panel in this photo. The long end should stick out to the rear of the panel, and to the bottom when it's folded up by the piano hinge under the bench.

    SO, "How's it work, Sarge?" you ax. "Slicker'n snail snot!" I say!

    I bolted a Horror Fright front wheel chock in the front, and you don't even need to use tie down straps, unless you're taking the front wheel off.

    One man can get any Harley up there by driving it right into a Horror Fright front wheel chock (#69026, for $26.99 on sale) and it locks in the front wheel. The same way, one person can kick the rear support forward and lower the bike while holding the front brake and let it roll backwards to the ground:
    http://s436.beta.photobucket.com/use...1e4e3.jpg.html



    That bike, BTW, is "Trusty45," that belongs to my buddy Rick, Rust&GreasilyBikes, a member of this forum, who doesn't like to type. He lurks. But he ain't shy with bondo and torch and a paint gun! He built my sidecar, painted Ol' Tex, and will have one or two more pleasant surprises in coming weeks.

    Like a dentist whose own kids' teeth are rotting, he keeps puttin' off completing this sweet little 45, along with the hot-rod Panhead in his back room, but he's right now helping me put some touches on Ol' Tex. He says he mainly feels sorry for Spot, denied rides in his sidecar while we work on my '37 in the garage! Poor dog.



    So, dere ya go. You don't hafta put that Chi-Com front wheel chock on it, but it sure makes life easier.

    Materials Required:
    (1) 4x8 of 3/4" plywood, finished one side.
    (2) 1 x 12 of pine, 5' each
    (2) 1x2s, 8' long.
    (1) 2x2, 24" long.
    about 18 feet of 1x6 pine cut in 24" and 25-1/2 inch pieces for crosspieces.
    (3) 1/4" all-thread rods, 20 t.p.i., 26-1/2" long.
    (6) 1/4" x 20 nuts.
    (6) 1/4" flat washers.
    (4) 3/8" x 3-1/2" carriage bolts.
    (4) 3/8" x 4" carriage bolts with
    ( 3/8" flat washers.
    ( 3/8" nuts.
    (1) rear support, a 17-1/2 x 20" panel.
    (1) piano hinge, abt. 20" long, w/screws.
    (1) "screen door spring," about 12" long.
    (2) wood screws and clips to secure the ends of the spring.

    A box (about 50) #10 flat head wood screws, 1-1/2" long.
    optional:
    (1) Harbor Freight #69026 wheel chock, on sale till January for $26.99; reg. 50 bucks.
    __________________
    --Sarge, Gerry Lyons, Florida
    1947 EL
    1948 FL Project
    1947WL Project
    2000FLSTC

    But there's booze in the blender
    And soon it will render
    That frozen concoction that helps me hang on

    You never get better....you just get less awful. "Joe Walsh"

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Twin Cities, MN
    Posts
    3,053

    Re: Bike Building Workbench/Table?

    Just for you Michael
    1947 EL
    1948 FL Project
    1947WL Project
    2000FLSTC

    But there's booze in the blender
    And soon it will render
    That frozen concoction that helps me hang on

    You never get better....you just get less awful. "Joe Walsh"

  7. #17

    Re: Bike Building Workbench/Table?

    Thanks for that, Tomcat. You brought that whole thread over here. Just "copy>paste" or something more complicated? Anyway, thanks a bunch!
    Sarge, Gerry Lyons, Fla.
    AGENT ORRNGE Survivor. So far.
    The Friendly Fire that Keeps on Burnin'.
    F.O.G. member: http://flatheadownersgroup.com/
    www.37UL.com
    "It's a 1937, and the downside is, it's out of warranty"

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Smyrna, GA (Metro Atlanta)
    Posts
    388

    Thumbs up Re: Bike Building Workbench/Table?

    I love it, thanks. Looks like a good project that even someone feeble minded and a little off can put together.

    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat1 View Post
    Just for you Michael
    Michael Goehring

    2005 FLHRCI

    1962 FLF

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Vancouver Island B.C.
    Posts
    1,289

    Re: Bike Building Workbench/Table?

    I knew smebody would come along with the info you needed.

  10. #20

    Re: Bike Building Workbench/Table?

    Thanks for all of the fast replys! I'm a member over at ShovelheadUSA also, but thanks for reposting the info here for those that are not (and saved me from searching)

    The table I had in mind was like the one that duffeycycles posted. I agree that wheels are not a good idea. But I have some large adjustable feet that came off of a machine at work. I'm thinking put the feet in the corners made from 4x4 posts. Then the wheels could be slightly inset toward the middle of the table and higher up than the feet. So I can roll it to where I need it then drop the feet down and lift the wheels off the ground.

    It looks like the lift that Sarge made has a little extra length. I sure that is so the lift will function correctly. Does any one have the over length of a stock 45" with 16" wheels. Mine is in two pieces right now due to a wreck (that's the reason for the rebuild)

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