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tomcat1
02-08-2014, 12:04 PM
Well filed my taxes this morning and I've got enough to add a couple of much needed things to the garage. I've thought long and hard about a welder. I've been using gas. I think a mig will do nicely. I have enough of local talent to tig if I need that, I just need something to do small repairs. also I need a nice parts washer. I've been using a plastic concrete mixing tub on the floor and that's been getting really old. So I'm going to try to get this safety-kleen one. It's the most cost effective solvent washer I can find. Most others are about $1600.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v126/tomcatshaas/welder_zpsd6510572.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/tomcatshaas/media/welder_zpsd6510572.jpg.html)

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v126/tomcatshaas/SolventPartsWasher_Manual_Model_16_table_zps3d69e1 3d.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/tomcatshaas/media/SolventPartsWasher_Manual_Model_16_table_zps3d69e1 3d.jpg.html)

duffeycycles
02-08-2014, 01:14 PM
I tried the Miller before I bought my Lincoln!!!!way better control with Lincoln-17 years ago

Bigincher
02-08-2014, 08:58 PM
I also have a Lincoln Tig welder, but I'm no expert.
I'm Jonesing for the parts washer, it's on my "list'..... What brand are you looking at? Also, I noticed that the solvent is where the money gets invested.

Robert Luland
02-08-2014, 10:50 PM
That Miller unit is a great Mig for the price. I got 16 welders in my shop. All Blue and no regrets. You do not want to go welding on that tank with a Mig. You will blow right though it. In stead, buy a tig unit for a little bit more and learn to master it. Bob L

tomcat1
02-09-2014, 09:09 AM
Dont have time right now to master tig,,,,,I have friends that are masters and will weld the tank.

Big, I am looking intonones from safety-kleen. They are local and are a true petrolium solvent tank. I have tried the water based solvents with no luck.

ups
02-09-2014, 10:50 AM
Mineral spirits at Home Depot etc.

duffeycycles
02-09-2014, 10:54 AM
I was going to say mineral spirits-Safety Clean is blood sucking vampires-contract to change your fluid bleeds you if you don't use the crap out of it

tomcat1
02-09-2014, 11:14 AM
I am just looking to get the equipment from them,,,,if I can't then I have another source. The problem I find is all the cheepo parts washers say not to be used with mineral spirits. Im assuming its the pump.

tomcat1
02-09-2014, 11:16 AM
If anyone has a better idea, Im all ears

Bigincher
02-09-2014, 11:39 AM
I still use a pan with gasoline and a parts brush. That's the way we did it on the farm.......
Sometimes I use kerosene.

tomcat1
02-10-2014, 03:27 PM
After working in nice shops in my life time, I am tired of the old drain pan parts washer routine :)

axeric
02-10-2014, 05:41 PM
This is a very valuable topic as I am interested in a parts washer, and the strong points of Mig, and Tig; however, I think this topic would be better if it was in the 'Motorcycle Tools' catagory. I say that because if you want to do a search for this stuff someday, it may get lost in this thread. Also, I want to see what people are actually doing on their bikes and not what they're thinking about doing, or what they are screwing around on when they should be working on their 'Member Project':)

Rubone
02-10-2014, 07:59 PM
Good point Eric. Maybe Mr Big can move the hijacked section to a new thread.
What say you Big??

38knuckle
02-10-2014, 08:17 PM
I use Stoddard solvent and it works great imo.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_spirit

Rubone
02-10-2014, 08:37 PM
Stoddard solvent is Mineral Spirits, same thing sold by the gallon at Home Depot.
Last time I went to the Chevron Jobber and asked for Stoddard solvent the 20 year old counter guy gave me a blank stare...

indianut
02-11-2014, 08:55 AM
Just go to Craiglist and buy an old parts washer and get Mineral Spirits to fill it and never look back. You will spend as much or more on the Spirits as the tank! I have a small one, 12gallon by the Hone for dipping to clean the honing oil and a large one out side for cleaning parts, after I have done an initial cleaning on really cruddy stuff in a bucket of gas or kerosene, as they are less than half the price of Mineral Spirits! I take care of my Mineral Spirits and keep the parts washers airtight. Mineral Spirits is $8 a gallon around here!!


http://tampa.craigslist.org/hdo/pts/4323309950.html
http://tampa.craigslist.org/psc/for/4316268022.html

BigLakeBob
02-11-2014, 12:08 PM
I use Agitene made by Graymills sold by McMaster Carr #3229K1. A little pricey @ $108/ 5 gals + shipping. My unit takes 2 1/4 gal. But I use it almost daily and change about once a year. It has Lanolin in it and doesn't chap your hands(I personally hate using gloves) and IMO doesn't leave the 'oiley' base that mineral spirits does, blows off nice with air gun. My 2 cents. Bob

Charles.L.Pitts
02-11-2014, 09:02 PM
If you can weld with acetylene, you can easily learn to weld TIG, as you've already learned wire feeding and torch control. Heliarc gives you the added benefits of speed and control of amperage. Machines like the old Gold Star pictured are selling in the $500 to $700 range. You may even find one cheaper. Machines like this are bulletproof and will operate from a 50 amp (kitchen range) circuit. The versatility is miles ahead of MIG.
16225

Parts washers intended for aqueous cleaners will usually work with flammable solvents. That is why they have fusible links that close the lid in the event of fire. However, there are many types of solvents. Mineral spirits have a flash point of about 100 degrees. That is, at 100 degrees the solvent produces vapors that will ignite with a spark. High flash point solvents have a flash point of over 140 degrees. They clean well but take longer to dry. The product pictured comes from Tractor Supply, and is displayed next to the parts washers. However, Tractor Supply Corporate says the solvent shouldn't be used in the washer. It's more about lawyers than it is about reality.
16226

Robert Luland
02-12-2014, 05:06 AM
I should have mentioned this when I posted earlier. With a tig welder you can also weld with stick. With a mig your stuck with what ya got. A tig is a much more viable tool for the home or small shop for the buck. Bob L

indianut
02-12-2014, 07:51 AM
Machines like the old Gold Star pictured are selling in the $500 to $700 range. You may even find one cheaper. Machines like this are bulletproof and will operate from a 50 amp (kitchen range) circuit.

Will this machine weld cases? Do you need a water cooler to use it? Thanks

Charles.L.Pitts
02-12-2014, 09:51 AM
The machine pictured is rated at 400+ amps AC and DC and will weld anything that can be welded. A physically smaller 250 amp machine of the same vintage is also quite common. That machine will also do whatever is needed on a motorcycle. Water cooling is needed for a water cooled torch. Although a gas cooled torch will work on these or any other machines, I prefer water cooled because they are easier to handle and support higher amperage. My machine came with a cooler, a wheeled cart with cylinder mounts, a foot control, and about 25' of power cord for $700. I'm sure a patient person could beat that price.

tomcat1
02-20-2014, 11:30 AM
Calm before the Storm....:) Well last nights forecast didn't look good for spending money. But the Blizzard held off enough this morning to get my welder and Parts Washer. More new and photos at 6 and 10 :)

Bigincher
02-20-2014, 11:51 AM
Looking forward to the photos...!

tomcat1
02-21-2014, 01:06 PM
Here's what I went with. Safety-Kleen was easy to work with and so far I'm happy with the solvent tank. No solvent in it yet and I just stuck it in the corner until I get the rest of the drywall up in the garage. If it stays there, I will have to protect the wall as I tend to splash around a bit when I'm taking a bath. :)

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v126/tomcatshaas/IMG_0829_zps485aec33.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/tomcatshaas/media/IMG_0829_zps485aec33.jpg.html)

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v126/tomcatshaas/IMG_0830_zps2cdb3ff6.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/tomcatshaas/media/IMG_0830_zps2cdb3ff6.jpg.html)

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v126/tomcatshaas/IMG_0831_zps5160a9a2.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/tomcatshaas/media/IMG_0831_zps5160a9a2.jpg.html)

Bigincher
02-21-2014, 01:13 PM
Nice...!

A product called FRP will protect the drywall nicely. FRP stands for "Fiberglass Reinforced Panel". It comes in sheets, smooth or textured, and it's about 1/8" thick. It's used a lot in commercial bathrooms and kitchens. I'm sure you've seen it.
You can install it with mastic, or with button-head anchors. Smooth would work well for you.

Maybe you already know all this......

axeric
02-21-2014, 02:05 PM
You're going to have a great shop when you complete the finish work Sean. One thing to keep in mind; you should have at least 2 chairs so a guest can have a place to sit. Not just because it's the friendly thing to do, but because you want your guest to feel comfortable before you wrangle them into helping you with a shit job:)

Paps
02-21-2014, 03:16 PM
I used corrugated steel sheeting to overlap my walls. It protected against chemicals and heat, especially from lathe, mill, and drill chips heats and oil etc. chemicals. I did however aluminum paint the sheet metal. Price at the time to install the sheeting was real reasonable. Can't say what pricing is now though.

tomcat1
03-15-2014, 12:01 PM
went to tractor supply and got 2 five gallon cans of this solvent. I like it. It has less odor than the low odor mineral spirits. Also added an upgrade. A metal "stay-put" hose from McMaster-Carr.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v126/tomcatshaas/47Knuckle/IMG_0886_zps75c2930b.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/tomcatshaas/media/47Knuckle/IMG_0886_zps75c2930b.jpg.html)

http://www.caimag.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=16226&d=1392169065

old.wrench
03-17-2014, 12:04 PM
Nice...!

A product called FRP will protect the drywall nicely. FRP stands for "Fiberglass Reinforced Panel". It comes in sheets, smooth or textured, and it's about 1/8" thick. It's used a lot in commercial bathrooms and kitchens. I'm sure you've seen it.
You can install it with mastic, or with button-head anchors. Smooth would work well for you..

Maybe you already know all this......

Good idea Tom. FRP would work great around that wash tank. Nice bright finish, solvent resistant, and easy to clean. Several different colors with matching trims. Easy to work with and goes up fast. Use the mastic

Geo.

Steve Swan
03-17-2014, 01:23 PM
I'm wanting to get a heated ultrasonic cleaner. i'd like to have the tank be about 16" long x 10" wide x 12" deep. i know cost increases with size. what units have you guys found that you're happy with ?

38knuckle
03-17-2014, 02:45 PM
I should have mentioned this when I posted earlier. With a tig welder you can also weld with stick. With a mig your stuck with what ya got. A tig is a much more viable tool for the home or small shop for the buck. Bob L
I agree with Bob. I like my mig but I should have bought a tig. What would you recommend Bob for a home shop tig?
Len.

ronj
03-17-2014, 04:16 PM
Hi I don't mean to butt in but have you looked into maybe craigs list for used dental equipment my wife is a dental asst. they use ultrasonic cleaners everyday so you may check around some dentists just give old stuff away or pile it in a back room not knowing what to do with it if they trade them in they don't get much for them
Ron